Posted February 22, 2013

Video: Hawks’ fan’s half-court heave rests perfectly on rim

Atlanta Hawks, Ben Golliver, Utah Jazz

*****

By Ben Golliver

All sorts of ludicrous things take place on an NBA court during stoppages of play, but a season-ticket holder named Kevin topped them all during Friday night’s game between the Hawks and Jazz at Philips Arena.

As part of the Hawks’ “Money Shot” promotion, Kevin had a chance to win $1,000 by making a half-court shot. “I’m feeling pretty good,” Kevin said. “I’ll try [to make it].” With Hawks cheerleaders standing by and an emcee providing play-by-play, Kevin approached his shot as a one-hand toss, getting off a baseball-style heave that arced directly towards the hoop. Kevin’s try was just a touch long, but rather than bounce high off the rim or back off the backboard, the ball came to rest squarely on the back of the rim and didn’t move. The ball remained motionless for at least 14 seconds until the emcee ran up, grabbing the net to shake the ball free and through the hoop.

This video is mesmerizing and you’ll probably feel tempted to watch it 20 times to try to figure out how he managed to defy every law of physics and every norm of basketball you’ve ever been taught. This seems completely impossible. A basketball weighs 22 ounces. Kevin’s toss travels 40-plus feet in two seconds, meaning his throw is going roughly 13 miles per hour. Gravity hangs over all of this. Instead: thud followed by motionless silence. How is this possibly explained without Velcro, stick-em or magnets being involved?

The announcers on the video imply that Kevin was awarded his $1,000, even though the shot didn’t go directly in and even though he clearly stepped over the half-court line. Is $1,000 sufficient for an act of magic? Think back to the days of messing around in middle school gym class. You could hit, what, 10 half-court shots in an hour on a good day if you just launched them over and over? You could be in middle school for 50 years and not get a ball to do what Kevin did. At least he can expect his shot to receive a million YouTube views as a consolation prize.

The Hawks beat the Jazz 103-95, by the way, to improve to 21-14.

4 comments
JBFaulkner
JBFaulkner

Draker541 RU a genius or what? How the hell do U know anything about the NBA ball used in this context? Just had an urge to comment on another something U know nothing about AGAIN. ... MORON $#'@

SilverX2
SilverX2

he stepped over the line so it doesnt count 

aeronaut
aeronaut

This shot doesn't defy physics.  It's just incredibly lucky.  He hit the backboard and the rim support at exactly the same time, and the ball wedged itself down, pushing the spring down a tiny bit, and compressing the ball a little bit.  Less than a millimeter either way, and the ball bounces hard off either the backboard, the rim, or most likely both.  I agree with the author's assertion that you could attempt this shot perhaps a million times and you probably wouldn't duplicate this.

 

Dr. Martin Melhus,

Ph.D., Physics

draker541
draker541

It was pinned just like when it gets stuck on the side of the rim and backboard. The ball is not a standard NBA ball.. but more like a cheap street ball marked NBA.. those are usually more grippy.... Still a crazy shot.