Posted July 16, 2013

Bucks release Drew Gooden using amnesty clause

Ben Golliver, Drew Gooden, Milwaukee Bucks
(Rocky Widner/Getty Images)

Drew Gooden made it through three years of his five-year contract with the Bucks. (Rocky Widner/Getty Images)

The Bucks announced Tuesday that veteran forward Drew Gooden has been released using the amnesty clause.

Gooden, 31, averaged 3.3 points and 1.9 rebounds in 16 games for the Bucks last season. He was set to earn $6.7 million in both 2013-14 and 2014-15 after agreeing to a five-year deal worth $32 million in 2010. Per the terms of the league’s amnesty provision, the Bucks will still owe Gooden that salary but it will be removed from their books for salary cap and luxury tax purposes.

The 11-year veteran was considered overpaid as soon as he signed his contract in 2010, and he never shook that perception during his three seasons in Milwaukee, which were marred by injuries and DNP-CDs. The arrival of two talented, young big men — Larry Sanders and John Henson — helped make Gooden fully expendable and the Bucks also agreed to sign unrestricted free agent center Zaza Pachulia this summer.

Gooden will now enter a blind bidding pool, where teams that are under the salary cap can submit offers to take on a portion of his contract. If no bids are made in the blind pool, Gooden will become an unrestricted free agent.

So far this offseason, Milwaukee has signed Pachulia, traded for Luke Ridnour, sign-and-traded J.J. Redick to the Clippers, traded Luc Richard Mbah a Moute to the Kings, inked O.J. Mayo to a three-year deal, and made a four-year offer sheet to Hawks guard Jeff Teague, which Atlanta later matched.

Tuesday was the last day of the 2013 offseason for teams to use their amnesty clause. In addition to Gooden, Lakers forward Metta World Peace, Heat forward Mike Miller and Bobcats forward Tyrus Thomas were among this year’s amnesty casualties.

1 comments
RealJDSportsFan
RealJDSportsFan

It looks like the new rules are starting to correct the "bad" contracts teams were putting out there. It's interesting that the NBA had to basically save teams from themselves by rewriting the rules over and over. I suppose that is there is a balance between wanting to win at any cost and being irresponsible with money. Here's an article about why teams will be hesitant to exceed the cap with the new rules and why will so many more teams using the amnesty provision going forward:  http://wp.me/p2wecE-a2