Posted January 07, 2014

Grades: Cavaliers trade Andrew Bynum, draft picks to Bulls for Luol Deng

Andrew Bynum, Ben Golliver, Chicago Bulls, Cleveland Cavaliers, Luol Deng
Cavaliers center Andrew Bynum (left) was traded to the Bulls for forward Luol Deng (right). (David Liam Kyle/Getty Images)

Andrew Bynum (left) and Luol Deng (right) have been traded for each other. (David Liam Kyle/Getty Images)

The Cavaliers traded center Andrew Bynum and multiple draft picks to the Bulls for forward Luol Deng on Monday night.

In addition to Bynum, the Bulls will receive the Kings’ 2014 first-round pick (top-12 protected), the Trail Blazers’ 2015 and 2016 second-round picks, and the right to swap 2015 first-round picks with the Cavaliers (if Cleveland’s selection falls between 15-30).

Let’s break down the deal with grades for both sides.

Cleveland Cavaliers — Grade: B-plus

There is little to question about Cleveland’s acquisition of Deng and everything to question about what comes next. Re-signing Deng, and doing so on reasonable terms, could prove to be a very difficult and/or costly task, and a big-picture understanding of this trade can’t be realized until the ink is dry on Deng’s next contract.

For now, we can only assess the short-term implications of this move, ignoring the possibility that Deng could leave for nothing as a free agent in the summer or the harm that could be done by signing a 29-year-old (come April) forward who has logged nearly 23,000 minutes to the monster extension that he covets. With that in mind, the short-term implications of the move are overwhelmingly positive, even if the ceiling on Cleveland’s best-case scenario isn’t extraordinarily high.

At 11-23 and with Bynum’s contract guarantee date looming, Cleveland could have simply waived the center, saved itself the $6.3 million remaining on his contract and continued to putter along toward the stacked 2014 draft. That would have been a defensible strategy, but a fifth straight lottery appearance is not what owner Dan Gilbert (and his camera-friendly son Nick) had in mind when they won the rights to the No. 1 pick last year. The mandate then was clearly “playoffs or bust,” and this trade sends a message to Cavaliers fans that the postseason goal remains despite a crummy start to the season, which has been filled with locker-room drama, postgame angst from coach Mike Brown, questions surrounding Bynum’s health and attitude, and the league’s third-worst offense.

Deng is practically the prototype solution for what has ailed Cleveland. He fits into its biggest position of need: small forward. He brings much-needed virtues: dependability and professionalism. He’s a two-time All-Star, a no-nonsense veteran, a defensive force and a more-than-capable offensive player. He also has experience playing with a ball-dominant lead guard (Kyrie Irving will sub in nicely for Derrick Rose). His contract ($14.3 million this season) is fair for his services and currently carries no long-term pain. Add that all up, and he’s a very logical rental for a team whose hopeless season has shown a need for a legitimate boost.

One might argue that the biggest price Cleveland paid here was the cash savings for Bynum that it passed on to Chicago, as the draft picks aren’t much to write home about. The Sacramento pick is top-12 protected in 2014, top-10 protected in 2015 and top-10 protected in 2016, before it converts into a second-round pick. That pick is virtually guaranteed to remain Sacramento’s this year, and there’s a solid chance — given the Kings’ outlook relative to the rest of the Western Conference — that it doesn’t convey in either of the next two seasons.

Meanwhile, the right to swap 2015 first-round picks is protected against disaster: The worst-case scenario there is that Cleveland gives up the No. 16 pick for the No. 30 pick, and it’s far more likely that no swap takes place or that we’re talking about a matter of a few slots. That leaves the two second-round picks and the extra salary owed to Deng this season. It’s a cost but not a very steep one, and certainly one worth bearing if the other alternative is continuing through a bleak season. Basketball motivations can trump financial ones here because Gilbert has shown a willingness to spend on his roster and because Cleveland is well under the luxury tax, even after this move.

In the cramped East standings, the addition of Deng could theoretically carry Cleveland from its No. 13 slot all the way up to, say, the No. 5 or No. 6 seed. After all, the Cavaliers are only 4½ games behind Washington (14-17), which is fifth. Deng’s addition as a hole-plugging, stabilizing force should affect the Cavaliers much like the Wizards’ trade for center Marcin Gortat has this season. Proven commodities are worth their weight in gold, especially on young rosters that lack depth.

Where does this ultimately lead? Doesn’t the Cavaliers’ absolute best-case scenario for 2014 amount to the 2011-12 Sixers, who squeezed by the Bulls in the first round before being bounced in the conference semifinals? That might count as a success for Cleveland, given its rough recent history, but that shouldn’t be enough for this to be considered a “home run” move.

Looking ahead, if Deng decides to leave Cleveland, much like Andre Iguodala left Denver last summer, the Cavaliers will be pretty much back to where they were before signing Bynum last summer, minus a few second-round picks and a shot at Sacramento’s pick. That’s not much downside. The real lurking threat here is making a giant multi-year offer to Deng. USA Today Sports reported that he’s seeking a contract in the $15 million-per-year range, a price point should be too high for everyone, Cleveland included. Yahoo! Sports reported that Deng rejected the Bulls’ three-year, $30 million offer. He can be expected to command significantly more than that next summer, but the Cavaliers must exercise restraint in their negotiating with Deng, considering his miles, his injury history and the potential for age-related decline in the latter half of his next contract.

There is one final consideration: Cleveland’s 2014 draft pick. If the season ended today, Cleveland would have the league’s fifth-worst record, giving it an excellent shot at acquiring a blue-chip prospect in this year’s draft. A push up the standings, of course, will result in a slide down — and possibly out — of the lottery. Is renting Deng worth compromising a shot at Andrew Wiggins or Jabari Parker? No. It’s too early to throw that pick away yet, though, as Cleveland will still need to play its way out of the Central Division basement by enjoying good health and reeling off enough victories to break out of the pack. If something does go wrong between now and March, or if the new-look team simply can’t put it together, it can always massage the final few weeks of the season in an effort to regain some Ping-Pong balls.

Chicago Bulls — Grade: B-minus

Moving Deng, a franchise fixture since 2004, is a momentous decision for the Bulls. It seems reasonable to conclude, given Deng’s ability and ties to the organization, that this trade doesn’t happen right now if: A) Rose is healthy; and B) Chicago possessed a reasonable degree of certainty that it could re-sign Deng next summer.

Reports and whispers about the distance between the Bulls and Deng have existed for months, and they have intensified in recent weeks. Those rumors aren’t a smoking gun, but they do suggest that the two sides didn’t see totally eye-to-eye, and that is a major problem because of Chicago’s cap position.

Before the trade, the Bulls were deep into the luxury tax this season, and they were also committed to expensive deals for Rose, Carlos Boozer, Joakim Noah and Taj Gibson next summer. If Deng were willing to come back at the $10 million tag Chicago wanted, the Bulls, who aren’t exactly hurting for money, probably could have talked themselves into taking another shot at a championship run with that core led by a healthy Rose. If not, though, the Bulls were looking at major tax penalties this year, next year and a tough spot in 2015, when they would need to find a replacement for Boozer without much cap flexibility. Life under those conditions would be tough even if all of their key players were healthy; Rose, whose contract runs through 2017, stands as an unknown at this point, making such commitments tougher to swallow.

Waiving Bynum will save the Bulls from paying the non-guaranteed $6.3 million owed to him for the rest of the season, and it also should take them out of the luxury-tax territory this season, offering significant savings that could top $10 million. Bulls fans will lament the departure of a franchise cornerstone for financial reasons, and rightfully so, as there’s no dodging the emotions wrapped up in a decade-long relationship between player and community.

At the same time, Chicago is just 14-18 this season and, in the wake of Rose’s latest knee injury, possesses the league’s second-worst offense. The preseason championship aspirations are long gone, and it rarely makes sense to pay luxury-tax prices for lottery-level results. Recent reports have indicated that Boozer’s $16.8 million salary could be released using the amnesty clause next summer, putting the Bulls in position to build around a Rose/Noah/Gibson/Jimmy Butler core with more than $10 million in cap space. Chicago could also potentially have three 2014 first-round picks: its own pick, Charlotte’s pick (if it falls outside the top 10) and Sacramento’s (if it falls outside the top 12).

Even if both Charlotte and Sacramento hold on to their respective picks, Chicago’s own pick is now much more intriguing than it was before Monday’s trade. Just as Deng’s arrival could help send Cleveland up the standings, his departure should push Chicago down the standings. The Bulls have been noticeably better on both sides of the ball with Deng (97.9 offensive rating; 95.7 defensive rating) than without him (94.2 offensive rating, 100.3 defensive rating), and coach Tom Thibodeau will have no choice but to play Mike Dunleavy and rookie Tony Snell monster minutes. Although “tanking” is a profanity to many NBA fans and it surely isn’t in Thibodeau’s DNA, the best-case scenario for the Bulls’ season at this point is to lose as many games as possible. Landing Parker, a Chicago native, or another top-five-caliber player would make for a well-timed, if unexpected, infusion of A-list talent, and it would go a long way to healing the wounds created by Deng’s departure.

The significant financial impact of this trade, a good chance at a high lottery pick this year, two second-round picks and the possibility of a future first-round pick just doesn’t quite seem like enough for Deng, even when taking his contract uncertainty into account. Chicago made a defensible, business-minded decision that opens up options for the future, but the team did so without landing an asset worthy of any hype and it settled for such a scenario despite having months of advance warning about Deng’s opinion of his own market worth. That leaves the Bulls where they have often been: square in the cross hairs of those who suggest they pay too much attention to the bottom line. The best way to salvage this is to embrace the tank.

18 comments
chansen2796
chansen2796

Stuff happens, it's a business. It's not his fault, he's a very good player and will be for at least 5 more years. He's just not someone you can sink big $ into for the long term. And long term he's really not the piece that will help the Bulls contend for a title. He was for the last 5 years and things didn't workout 100%, so you've got to move on with a new plan. Good teams have to make the hard calls like this. Just like when the Hawks shelled so much depth after the Cup win in '10.

You have to solidify your core group and build around it. Noah and Butler should be staples for the next few years with a healthy but less dynamic Rose.

You develop Tony Snell and keep Taj as a 6th man. Or trade Taj too, no one is really THAT critical to this team at this point


For those who think melo should come to chicago.... Not a chance, he never plays defense and can't operate alongside another star, scoring player like Rose


Melo will never win a title in his prime. If sticks around long enough to turn into a role player like Ray Allen or Derek Fisher, maybe

He's single handed lay ruined the Knicks who keep digging a deeper hole with moves like signing Bargnani and Felton.

The Knicks are a BAD orgnization that makes poor personnel choices. The Bulls showed they have the fortitude to look beyond this season, which is undeniably lost.

They'll have cap room to sign Mirotic from Spain next year and if they get lucky to draft some quality talent in the back end of the first round this year, they could have good assets to trade away for one or two younger Dengs

If Butler can emerge as a real jump shooter this year the Bulls will be in great shape.

JohnG1
JohnG1

For the Bulls, I'd give the trade an A+ from a financial standpoint. From a basketball standpoint, I'd give them a B, since Deng was likely to leave anyway, and I'm not sure what they could have gotten that would have been *that* much better than what they got (I would have liked a first-round draft pick that didn't have an expiration date) while still giving them increased cap flexibility. The financial considerations are really important, so I think I'd give them an A- overall. I'd give Cleveland a B+ if Deng stays, a B- if he leaves.

HawthorneWingo
HawthorneWingo

"Basketball motivations can trump financial ones here because Gilbert has shown a willingness to spend on his roster and because Cleveland is well under the luxury tax, even after this move."  


How does Gilbert do it, transform otherwise good sportswriters into blabbering idiots?  Why has perception morphed into reality?  Gilbert has paid the luxury tax in only 3 of 9 seasons, he's collected other teams' luxury tax 6 seasons, he's had rock bottom payrolls many of those 9 seasons, some near the very bottom of the NBA.  He does NOT "spend."  Period, end of story.  No LeBron, no reason to even think about it.

JosephBagadoughnutz
JosephBagadoughnutz

bynum to the heat ?  riley is probably one of the last old timers that might be able to control him

The5wineFlu
The5wineFlu

Cavs have only been to 3 straight lotteries and this season would be a 4th, not the 5th.

Hammer109
Hammer109

Bulls fans may disagree, but as a Knick fan, I commend the Bulls front office for their strategic and long range thinking.  I'd love to get those draft picks plus cap space.  The Bulls have done this before after the Phil-Michael break-up.  They were bad for a couple of years, then they got competitive again. Does this kind of approach guarantee a championship?  No, of course not and it never will.  But it does show a front office that has at least some understanding of how to build a team.  Something that is sadly lacking in New York.

airmjbsanders
airmjbsanders

This is a solid move for both teams.  Once Rose went down for the season, there was really no choice in CHI but to tank.  What would be the point of squeezin into the bottom of the East playoffs and gettin bounced by IND or MIA in R1.  The benefits to the Cavs are obvious.


My only questions is why the Fakers didn't do this trade w/ PGasol?  I think its official that Mitch no longer calls the shots on personnel moves in LaLa land...

RayHuggyBearYoung
RayHuggyBearYoung

Why didn't the author at least explore the scenario that the Bulls keep Bynum?  How would he fit in?  

lionoah
lionoah

The Cavs made a fine move, not a great one, just a fine move. Sure they could have waited for yet another first round 'savior', but who pray tell is going to show these young guys with all this potential and talent how to play ball? Kyrie? Sideshow? Jarret Jack? The Cavaliers have plenty of talent in fact. If Deng can lift this team (and it is totally in his interest to try to do so), than perhaps Kyrie will stay, and by being a better team perhaps some of the roster potential begins to bear fruit.


On the other hand, if Deng doesn't move the needle and leaves, the Cavs are still likely in the lottery and have a chance at getting a 'good' player. But the NBA draft is never a sure thing. The last sure thing in the draft was Lebron and honestly, I'm not sold on any of these guys coming out. They are all still unproven.

MMoney0021
MMoney0021

Anyone who thinks the Bulls were foolish for making this trade has no idea how the NBA works.  The window of opportunity officially closed this year with Rose going down yet again.  So for the third straight year, a legit contender to the Miami Heat, becomes a fringe playoff team from a talent standpoint.  


Currently the Bulls have cap space, 2 future first round picks from Sacramento and Charlotte and the ability to tank and get into the lottery this season with what is considered to be the most talented draft class since LeBron James's class.  


This trade makes total sense seeing as though your window of winning a championship officially closed with this group of players.  Its time to start over, considering you do not know if Rose is still the corner stone player he once was or the next Brandon Roy and this is coming from one of the biggest Rose fans you will find.

Breakingpoint91
Breakingpoint91

As a Bulls fan I'm dying a little inside here. This just screams tanking and the Bulls aren't really know for that and I hate it. They could have traded for someone that will not get cut/waived near instantly or rides the bench whole season like Bynum. Deng is an almost star, or all-star and they should have gotten AT LEAST Dion waiters back. Waiters wanted out and this would have been a perfect trade to get rid of him in. BUT NO, Lets take picks and salary cap over staying competive I.E. tanking. Great. Even D Rose didn't want this to happen and they still are going to tank. Unless the get Parker, Randle, Exum, LaVine, or Wiggins, we are f'ed next year.

Joseph Rodocker
Joseph Rodocker

Great article! The point about sacramento being in the bottom of the west pretty much clearly points out that this trade ultimately boils down to two 2nd round picks and cap savings from a brilliantly structured contract for Deng in the 2014 season. As a cavs fan I love this swap!

MMoney0021
MMoney0021

@Breakingpoint91 If you're telling me this teams goal is to compete as a 5-8 seed then yes this trade is terrible.  The 2011 ECF's vs Miami seams like ages ago.  Thanks to the last 3 years without Rose, we are FORCED to make this move if you ever want to get back to the ECFs anytime soon.  I know I do and it is going to take both cap room and picks to make it happen.  

HawthorneWingo
HawthorneWingo

@Joseph Rodocker Because Cavs fans aren't typically the sharpest knives in the drawer.  That Sacramento pick would have been a second-rounder until the ownership change and the deal for the new arena was made.  Now it's probably going to be a first-rounder.  Meaning this is simply a meaningless rental to save Chris Grant's job.  That's where it begins, that's where it ends.  And, if he offers Deng a ridiculous contract to stay, then the guy that replaces Grant a few years down the line will be stuck with another horrible contract.

Joseph Rodocker
Joseph Rodocker

Wingo dingo do you sit in your moms basement and dream this stuff up? The scramento pick is a protected 1st rounder until 2017 then it becomes a fully guaranteed 2nd rounder! ItIis highly protected, check the provisions you amateur. This is a bottom dwelling team in the tough western conference. Yes it may be a rental, but at the end of the day the cavs only gave a few useless picks away for it with the liberty of turning around the second week of Feb and dangling Deng's expiring contract for trade bait..... this is business and obviously way over your head......good day:)