Posted January 19, 2014

NBA fines Mavericks owner Mark Cuban $100,000 for confronting referees after loss

Ben Golliver, Dallas Mavericks, David Stern, Los Angeles Clippers, Mark Cuban

The NBA announced Saturday that Dallas owner Mark Cuban has been fined $100,000 for “confronting the game officials on the court after the conclusion of the game and directing inappropriate language” following the Mavericks’ 129-127 loss to the Clippers in Los Angeles on Jan. 15.

With less than 15 seconds remaining and the Mavericks leading 127-126, Jamal Crawford attacked the paint to create a pull-up, mid-range jumper. As Crawford went up for the shot, Shawn Marion reached in slightly before pulling both of his arms back, and the officials awarded two foul shots on the play. Crawford hit both shots and the Clippers held on for the victory.

Following the game, cameras captured Cuban walking onto the court and yelling at the referees. That night’s crew consisted of Ron Garretson, Karl Lane and Leroy Richardson.

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban yells at the referees following a Dallas loss. (NBA TV)

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban yells at the referees following a Dallas loss. (NBA TV)

As it turns out, Cuban was just asking to be fined, literally.

“I couldn’t let the [commissioner] go without a proper farewell,” Cuban tweeted on Saturday, referencing the retirement of NBA commissioner David Stern. “It’s been a fun 14 years of trying to create change and donating to the [doughnut] fund!”

ESPNDallas.com reported that Cuban, who has been sanctioned repeatedly by Stern for his comments about the league’s referees, told reporters before the Clippers game that he planned to draw one last fine before Stern retired on Feb. 1.

“We talk about it all the time,” Cuban said. “I’m going to have one final fine before he leaves.”

Reached Thursday in London, where he is attending the Brooklyn Nets-Atlanta Hawks game at the O2 Arena, Stern said of Cuban’s plan to get fined: “I know he is trying, but our muffin fund coffers are overflowing.”

Mission accomplished.

Cuban, 55, has been fined nearly $2 million by the NBA since he took over as owner of the Mavericks in 2000.

Twice this season, the NBA has acknowledged errors made by referees in late-game situations that led to wins by the Mavericks. The league said that Shawn Marion should have been called for a late foul on Timberwolves forward Kevin Love on Dec. 30. Less than two weeks later, the league announced Monta Ellis should have been called for a last-second foul on Pelicans guard Austin Rivers on Jan. 13.

Those announcements prompted Cuban to call for even greater transparency that extends past game-deciding, last-second plays.

“I love the transparency,” Cuban said, according to the Dallas Morning News. “Now if I can just get them to do the same level of transparency for the other 47 minutes, 55 seconds, we’ll really be making progress. …  If you’re evaluating and you’re being held accountable and you’re proud of the work you do, why wouldn’t you? … It’s better if it’s public. “Why not? What’s to hide?”

Video via YouTube user NBAshowtimeHD8

10 comments
ArnoldRiveron
ArnoldRiveron

Stern is a bad and corrupt greedy nba commissioner. I'm not holding my breath with Silver. Especially that Stern picked him as his successor.

mjt424
mjt424

David Stern has his critics and I disagree with his overly controlling approach at times. Mark Cuban has always had an issue with officiating and if it's shaky, he should be upset yet his approach will never bring about the desired change. He is looked at by the league office as someone whom can't control his emotions and loves the spotlight. 

While the league respects him greatly as a businessman I would imagine they have little respect for his approach to conflict and thus don't take him seriously. Cuban, of course, probably wouldn't act in the way he does if he felt he was heard and taken seriously. The league could respond in a better way. Maybe if Cuban got fellow owners together in an alliance that would get the league's attention.

CarlLegg
CarlLegg

Oh Gawd...   Cuban is a BILLIONAIRE. He throws down $100k fines like you buy a cup of Starbucks. Literally. He knew what he was doing, and the publicity you've just given him is surely worth a LOT more than the fine. Mission accomplished: Cuban.

nortran11
nortran11

As a life long Sonics fan, I have nothing but love and respect for Mark Cuban. He was one the very few guys to stand up against the establishment and call foul

Rickapolis
Rickapolis

Mark Cuban is as good an owner as there is in all of sports. When he sees b.s. he calls it b.s. Almost no other owner has that courage. And it's cost him TWO  million dollars. Conversely, David Stern is, and was, a terrible commissioner. The NBA will be a far, far better place without him.

JerryPeoples
JerryPeoples

@Rickapolis while i like cuban as an owner what was his stance when his team won on two non calls.  did he call the league immediately and tell them they effed up or did he go crying to the refs and asks that the right calls be made?

AaronDunckel
AaronDunckel

@RickapolisStern has done a ton for the NBA over the last couple decades.  Of course there is the popular masses' interpretation of him... but in reality he's made the league wildly popular and visible in America and beyond... and that was his job

Snow_Veil
Snow_Veil

@AaronDunckel @Rickapolis 

Frankly, Stern gets more credit than he deserves for the growth of the NBA.


Stern presided over the league at a time when television revenue streams and later, the internet, were exploding. He capitalized on it to a competent degree, but anything less would have been seen as a failure. Small market teams still struggle to remain financially viable and competitive on the court. 


At the same time, Pete Rozelle (and later Tagliabue) showed insight and capacity far beyond Stern's to capitalize on the changing media environment, turning the NFL into an absolute juggernaut of media and pop culture dominance - and they didn't have the benefit of American-style football having any international relevance to leverage, as Stern did with the NBA.


Stern was competent but not visionary in moving the NBA into the modern age - he didn't do anything special. Making the league 'popular and visible' was a baseline for competence given the evolution of the media environment during his tenure, not an indicator of excellence.