Posted January 22, 2014

My ’14 All-Star starters: Why Roy Hibbert edges Carmelo and more picks explained

2014 All-Star Weekend, Rob Mahoney
Kevin Love

Despite the Wolves’ struggles, Kevin Love has shined brightly this season. (Jordan Johnson/NBAE via Getty Images)

WESTERN CONFERENCE

F: Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
30.9 points, 7.8 rebounds, 5.1 assists and 1.5 steals per game; 50.2% FG, 41.1% 3PT

Calls don’t come much easier than this. Durant has an unimpeachable résumé: He’s been the NBA’s best player this season, has balanced a massive workload with high efficiency and is doing it all for one of the best teams in the league. If there is a single, persuasive argument as to why Durant wouldn’t deserve a spot in the West’s starting lineup, I know not of it.

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F: Kevin Love, Minnesota Timberwolves
25 points, 13 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 0.9 steals per game; 45.9% FG, 38.6 % 3PT

Love’s individual success has contrasted sharply with the Wolves’ deflated record. On most every night, he’s the best thing Minnesota has going. Love has evolved into one of the game’s most prolific point generators. His bulk scoring (fourth in the league in points per game) comes through incredibly flexible means, dependent on situational matchups and Love’s own inclinations. He’ll power his way inside for post-ups as easily as he’ll step into a quick-fire three-pointer — a combination that makes Love almost impossible to guard without trade-offs elsewhere on the floor. That potency as a catch-and-shoot threat, in particular, causes all kinds of problems for defenses; such is inevitable when an opposing big man is forced to float out to the perimeter and chase Love around screens, responsibilities that test the integrity of entire defensive systems.

The 25-year-old Love also acts as a rebounding catch-all and a productive passer. Few are capable of mounting so complete an assault on the standard box score. Love fills it up across multiple columns, dominating the game offensively and bailing out the Wolves’ iffy defense with his ability to close possessions with a rebound. His case would be even more complete if he were a more competent defender.

F: LaMarcus Aldridge, Portland Trail Blazers
24.2 points, 11.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists, 0.9 steals and 1.0 blocks per game; 47.6% FG

Aldridge is an unusual talent, and his success at the center of the NBA’s best offense has more than earned him a place as an All-Star starter. Portland’s offensive structure relies on many things — the shooting of Damian Lillard, the flexibility of the Blazers’ wings, the ability of every player to read and react as necessary. But no single factor is more crucial than Aldridge’s capacity to create advantages and convert difficult shots, particularly from zones on the floor that are typically inefficient. It takes a special player to turn long-range post-ups into a healthy diet, and Aldridge is just that.

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Plus, he separates himself rather cleanly from many other candidates with his defensive abilities, both on the ball and in help situations. Aldridge isn’t so effective to salvage Portland’s still-underwhelming team defense, but he’s legitimately helpful in coverage and his presence has coincided with a 6.7-point swing in points allowed per possession, according to NBA.com.

G: Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
23.5 points, 9.2 assists, 4.6 rebounds and 1.9 steals per game; 44.2% FG, 38.3% 3PT

A remarkable shooter, a spicy ball handler and an awesome, fluid passer — Curry doesn’t just deserve inclusion in the All-Star Game, but we also flat-out need him there. The spectacle in his play alone is worth an All-Star berth, though Curry makes it easy by also ranking as one of the league’s best offensive players. His gravity is unmistakable; few players draw such concerted defensive attention so far from the basket, and fewer still are capable of then breaking down the defense the way Curry can.

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He commits a ridiculous number of turnovers in the process, but Curry’s shooting is so demanding of defenses and so lethal that the giveaways are almost beside the point. He influences the game on an every-play level offensively. When he’s without the ball, a defender still has to stay glued to Curry, no matter what happens elsewhere on the floor. When he’s in control of the offense, every dribble and hesitation bears the threat of a pull-up jumper, which on average for Curry holds an effective field goal percentage of 50.2, per SportVU. He’s basically a walking cause for defensive overreaction, which in turn opens up scoring chances for every other Warrior.

G: James Harden, Houston Rockets
24.3 points, 5.3 assists, 5.0 rebounds and 1.4 steals per game; 44.9% FG, 33.5% 3PT

This is Chris Paul’s spot, but Harden gets the call with CP3 injured. His credentials are well-established at this point: Harden may be one of the NBA’s sleepiest perimeter defenders, but he’s such a creative dynamo on offense that it’s impossible to deny him. Houston is one of the NBA’s most efficient scoring teams in large part because of Harden’s work as an impetus. His ability to maintain an exceptional true shooting percentage while playing such a prominent role anchors Houston’s scoring. His endless foul-baiting buoys the Rockets’ league-best free-throw rate. And Harden’s drive-and-kick work activates so much of his team’s offense – whether through direct pick-and-rolls with Dwight Howard or a pass out of a drive leading to the pass leading to the pass leading to an open three-pointer.

He’s a gaudy scorer and an effective passer, but moreover: So much of an elite offense can be traced directly back to Harden. That counts for quite a bit, and in this case gives Harden the edge over a very competitive crop of Western Conference guards.

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15 comments
myhandlerules
myhandlerules

Well, f**k "King James" for coasting. The only reason that punk - and all NBA stars -  are bazillionaires is because fans pay to come and see their skills an athleticism on display. If he wants to coast, take a pay cut.

GYK86
GYK86

Silly that the format requires Hibbert to be compared to Carmelo, but that doesn't mean Carmelo should be left off.  He's 3rd in scoring (barely behind Lebron), has cut down his turnovers and is grabbing 9 boards per game.


Knicks are awful and Carmelo is basically playing alone out there.  He's having a typical (if not better) year and clearly deserves the nod.  He's still a top player, even if the Knicks will lose 50+ games.

dabbs346
dabbs346

Joakim Noah > Roy Hibbert



Blues_head
Blues_head

Roy Hibbert is a great choice.  The concept of an NBA All Star Team without a center is absurd.  Not sure if it is xenophobia ( so many centers not from the US ) or what idiot marketing strategy the NBA is working with here, but a big part of basketball is about being tall and an all star team that does not include centers makes no sense to me.  Center forwards and guards that's a basketball team.

KevinB2014
KevinB2014

Hibbert vs. Anthony? No contest. It will be sad if Hibbert doesn't get voted in. He's far more deserving than Anthony. Clearly the best center in the East.


tommywood93
tommywood93

What about DeMar DeRozan? He's much more deserving than Wade. 

jazynaz
jazynaz

what happened to jeremy lin?  i thought he was way ahead of harden in the voting, last time i looked.

brooklynkid
brooklynkid

@GYK86Hey the sadness of it all is that blind hate opinions as it does as it relates to Anthony.  Anthony has clearly played and carried the Knicks to any and all extent of its very marginal success notwithstanding the fraudness of Jeremy Lin, the complete bogusness of Stat with what? his upmteen injuries and classic battles with firefighting equipment, and through it all, Anthony has sustained.  I simply would not blame Anthony one bit if there is a exodus of the Knicks.  Its simply like he's not play with a Westbrook as is the case of Durant, or a Wade or Bosh as is the case of Lebron, or a Roy as is the case of George, or a Pierce, Allen, Rondo as was the case of Garnett, or even a Griffin/Paul, Kobe/Gasol to say the least, yet you have a constant in the case of hating fools expecting Anthony as a solo component to carry the load and win championships.  I simply say.........how ignorantly delusional some are............enough said......the kid and I'm out...........suckers!

brooklynkid
brooklynkid

@KevinB2014outside of Lebron and Durant there is not a player even close to Anthony.  You take this hype machine George and put him on a team as flawed as the Knicks and I'm 100 percent sure he couldn't carry them at the magnitude of Anthony.  You hater of Anthony and the Knicks are completely ignorant and simply need to stfu with your hate filled ignorance.  I mean Anthony is only averaging 26, 8.2, 3, and one block and yet you hate filled fools let hate blind reality.  Get real please......maggots.  Roy is a center but we have the fool NBA with this crap "front court players",.......yeah right.  I've been watching the league for over 43 years, and yes, I have a valid and lucid opinion, morons........stfu.........Anthony is solid and most importantly, deserving!

Alex41
Alex41

@tommywood93Lowry has been much better overall than Derozan to the Raptors success, altho Derozan is definitely playing much better sans Rudy

LinhNguyen1
LinhNguyen1

@brooklynkid @KevinB2014 then your name should be 'old fart'.  A team needs a center.  I'll agree that Anthony may be better than George at the forward position, but Hibbert is the better CENTER than Anthony.

Marc6
Marc6

@brooklynkid @KevinB2014 


Actually, when has carmelo, with all his talent, led his team to any playoff success? Look at how well the Suns are doing compared to Melo's team. As great as he is, Melo doesn't make those around him better.


LinhNguyen1
LinhNguyen1

@Mr. J @jazynaz it's a popularity contest, Lin is a below average player but there are ~2billion Chinese people?